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Decisions, decisions and a little bit of procrastination…

5

June 6, 2010 by Renee

To agent or not to agent…I really don’t know anymore. Yes, an agent is the smart way to go, but damn it, I am not the most patient person in the world. I’m not patient at all.

Here’s my problem. Yes, I’m aware I have many. But in terms of seeking an agent, I am finding my newness is a hurdle. My novel is a hurdle. And, my frustration at this is becoming an issue. I have another novel that is more marketable, more ‘mainstream’, but took half as much blood, sweat, and tears to write. Do I set aside this first one until I’ve established my name and my ability? I don’t want to. This novel proves my ability far better than any other could. The problem is not the writing. Hell, I don’t think any agent I’ve received a rejection from has looked at a sample of the writing. I think the problem is the query, the subject matter, and well, money.

The query is rather…stiff. I’ve reworked it, made it more like my writing than a proposal, but you can’t resubmit a query for the same project. Not allowed. So, that’s not fixable in terms of agents I’m still waiting to be rejected by. The subject matter. Hmm. How does one show that although this particular subject has been done, it hasn’t been done like you’ve done it? How do I show it is unique without sounding like a pompous ass? The writing? Well, that would be simple wouldn’t it? If they took samples of the writing. And I’m new. I can’t prove to them that I can sell books. Well I could, given the chance, but for them it’s a risk. I understand this, but…

So, now my question is: Do I continue the search for an agent or do I start looking at other options? Originally, I promised myself I’d wait it out. I’d plug away at sending out query after query until I found the ‘right’ agent for me. I said I would not allow my impatient nature convince me to do otherwise. Well, there’s perseverance, believing in yourself, optimism…and then there’s stupidity. Recently I started looking at facts. Dangerous thing to do if you want to keep a promise like that. In Canada (which is where I live) most writers are unagented. Most. At least 80%. There are only about thirty Literary Agencies in Canada. In ALL of Canada. Add to that the fact that few new (as in unpublished) writers are taken on as clients. The odds keep narrowing. I could look elsewhere, and I am, but now I’m considering a different approach.

Small Presses. Indie Publishers. The Little Guy.

I wrote an article for Examiner.com about Small Presses in Canada. The thing is, they outnumber the big guys in a big way. (excuse the repetition) Many authors start small and move onto bigger and better. Wait, better? I don’t know. Small presses, while not huge money makers, encourage new authors to submit, nurture their writers and work with them to build their career, and they don’t make them jump through hoops just to get that contract. They publish writers who show them they can write. Then they worry about selling. (of course, this is a generalization, based on the publishers I researched, and I’m sure that there are some small presses with the same policies as big publishers.) Hmm.

So, do I pursue these small presses? Worry about an agent when I have a history of publications and sales to show them? They say they are looking for new talent, but they also stress you include your publishing credits.

Well, I’ve kind of made a decision already. I’m not long on patience as I said. I understand why agents and bigger publishers want to see some kind of track record, proof that you know what you’re doing. This is business and business doesn’t care about the giant goose egg on my head resulting from numerous bashes against the wall. They care that I’ve done the work to prove to them I am worth that risk. I am going to have to give them that proof. 

I think that to hold out for the dream of agent, big contract, and advance is rather…delusional. Time to start thinking of my efforts to publish less as a dream and more like a business.

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5 thoughts on “Decisions, decisions and a little bit of procrastination…

  1. Henry Lara says:

    I'll like your way of thinking. This is a business, so I congratulate you on researching the facts. There is no need to focus only on big publishers, and small presses have several advantages to. I would say by all means go for it. Now, I know it makes us a bit down, but remember that you are not the only writer who has to put aside something he/she truly loved and work on something that feels less meaningful. We have friends with the same issue. It's just the way it is. One question: Can you submit to American agents? On any case, take a break, clear your mind, and hit those small publishers. And work on your next project. Cheer up, you are great writer, let's keep working hard. You are not a quitter, and I love how when something is not working you pause to think for a minute, and then see what can be done to fix it. Keep plowing along.

  2. Renee Miller says:

    Thank you, Henry. And yes, I've been querying agents all over the place. If what they publish looks like it fits my work, they get a query. Now, if only they'd read it…I'm not a quitter. Quit is not in my vocabulary. Frustrated, now and then discouraged, but as you know, once you've put so much of yourself into something, quitting is not an option.Good thing I'm used to plowing.

  3. Henry Lara says:

    Good for the muscles, I hear.

  4. Tahlia says:

    My advice is – don't be impatient, learn to play the waiting game instead. Why? Because timing is an interesting thing. I got my agent becasue the others rejected me. She wasn't accepting submissions when I first tried, so I didn't hit her until 6 months after the others. By then I had improved the book. I'm going to write about waiting and timing on my blog sometime.I decided to start with agents at home (Australia – even smaller than Canada) , because they can save you a lot of work if you get one, then I figured I'd go directly to publishers – big ones first, then little ones, if that didn't work I'd look into small publishers and the internet and then self publishing. There is definitly a point where small publishers are the way to go.

  5. Renee Miller says:

    Thanks Tahlia, and I've become very adept at the waiting game. I just can't handle sitting on my hands and not actively moving something along. I'm still querying agents, but I've added small publishers to my list and we'll see what happens first.Good advice though. I appreciate it.

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Renee

Renee

I like to write stuff. Sometimes it's funny. I've published some novels and short fiction. I also battle an addiction to cake and potato chips, and I sometimes have inappropriate fantasies involving Kevin Spacey.

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